5 Principles You Should Follow to Teach Listening for English as a Lingua Franca Use

It’s no secret that English has become the global lingua franca.

We all know that English has become the global lingua franca used primarily for communication between ‘non-native speakers’.

The problem is, though, that many course books:

  • still focus a lot on a very narrow range of ‘native speaker’ accents
  • if recordings of ‘non-native speakers’ are present, they’re typically recorded by actors.

This obviously misrepresents the diversity of the English language.

It also might not adequately prepare our students for understanding the wide array of accents they’ll hear when they leave our classes.

So bearing this in mind and the sheer variety of Englishes that our students are likely to encounter when they leave our classrooms, teaching listening skills becomes vital.

But how do we go about it?

How do we reflect this linguistic variety in our listening classes?

How can we help students understand different accents?

How can we use a wider range of ‘non-native’ voices in our listening materials?

In this video I want to tackle this challenge head on and share with you my 5 principles for teaching listening for English as a Lingua Franca use.

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