Understand and Untangle Native Speakerism to Get Hired as a Non-Native Speaker Teacher

Our usual first contact with native speakerism might be seeing countless ads for ‘native speakers’ only or for ‘native level’ teachers.

As ‘non-native speakers’ we might also experience native speakerism when we get turned down for a job, because of our mother tongue (despite having all the right qualifications)

Or when we hear that we can’t teach pronunciation well, because we have a foreign accent.

But this is just the tip of the iceberg…

So if as a profession we are serious about tackling native speakerism and promoting equality, it is vital we understand what native speakerism and how it is spread and normalised in ELT.

Also, as a ‘non-native speaker, this will help you better understand the reasons why many recruiters prefer ‘native speakers’ and learn how to tackle these so you can increase your job opportunities.

That’s why in this video you will learn what the ideology of native speakerism is so that you are better prepared to respond to it.

If you want more tips like these that will boost your chances of getting hired as a ‘non-native speaker’, download my FREE guide “6 Fool-Proof Tips to Boost Your Professional Profile and Get Hired as a Non-Native Speaker Teacher”.

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5 Top Tips to Get Hired in Prague as a Non-Native Speaker Teacher

Looking for jobs as a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher can be pretty depressing. I’m sure you’ve seen all these job ads for ‘native speakers’ only.

But, despite this widespread preference for ‘native speakers’, some ‘non-native’ teachers have become incredibly successful. They have managed to overcome the initial bias against them and to succeed.

What have they done differently?

What can we learn from their success?

How can you apply their tactics to give your own career a boost and get hired as a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher?

To find out, I interviewed Karin Krummenacher, who has been a teacher and a teacher trainer and who is currently doing her MA in TESOL in the UK. In this 5 minute extract from the interview, Karin shares her top 5 tips to get hired as a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher.

If you’d like to watch the entire interview, and other interviews like this one with successful ‘non-native speaker’ teachers from around the world, take a look at my course “How to Become a Highly Employable and Successful ‘Non-Native Speaker’ Teacher”.

And if you’d like to get more FREE tips on how to get hired as a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher, download the FREE guide “6 Fool-Proof Tips to Boost Your Professional Profile and Get Hired as a Non-Native Speaker Teacher”.

Click on the button below to get it via FB Messenger:

Or via email:

 

Why as a Non-Native Speaker Teacher You Should Take a Proficiency Test to Dispel Recruiter’s Worries and Get Hired

When you ask recruiters why they might be reluctant to hire a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher, one of the first answers you’ll get (apart from the market demand from students) is their worry about the candidate’s proficiency:

  • Will their English be good enough?
  • Will they have a foreign accent? (not that there’s anything wrong with having one, mind you)
  • Will they be able to teach all levels, including proficiency?

That’s why I think it is vital that as a ‘non-native speaker’ you get a proficiency test. This will:

  • prove your level of proficiency
  • dispel some of the recruiter’s immediate worries about your English
  • increase your chances of getting hired.

And in this video I talk about how to choose the right proficiency test for yourself and how you can use it to boost your job opportunities as a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher.

If you want more tips like these that will boost your chances of getting hired as a ‘non-native speaker’, download my FREE guide “6 Fool-Proof Tips to Boost Your Professional Profile and Get Hired as a Non-Native Speaker Teacher”.

Click on the button below to get it via FB Messenger:

Or via email:

 

Get Hired as a ‘Non-Native Speaker’: Your three unique strengths

We hear so much about why ‘native speakers’ are supposedly better teachers that it’s easy to start losing confidence as a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher…

It’s easy to forget that as a ‘non-native speaker’ you can also be a great teacher.

That you’ve got your unique strengths.

And that you can use these to start getting the jobs you deserve to be getting (despite the widespread preference for ‘native speaker’ teachers).

That’s why in this video, I’m going to show you 3 UNIQUE strengths you’ve got as a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher and how you can showcase these to the prospective recruiter.

This will help you boost your confidence and increase your chances of getting hired.

So if you’re a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher who is looking to boost their employability, watch the video now:

 

If you want to download the FREE guide “6 Fool-Proof Tips to Boost Your Professional Profile and Get Hired as a Non-Native Speaker Teacher”, click on the button below to get it via FB Messenger:

Or via email:

Get Hired as a ‘Non-Native Speaker’: 5 top tips to a cracking LinkedIn profile

Trying to get hired as a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher can be a rather grim affair…

Half of job ads out there are for ‘native speakers’ only.

The other half gives you a polite ‘No’, or never replies.

As a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher myself, I know how frustrating this might feel. I’ve been there.

But it really doesn’t have to be like this.

You can start getting the jobs you deserve, despite the ‘native speaker’ bias.

And to help you do just that, I’m putting together short, actionable video tips that are guaranteed to boost your employability.

In the first video, I’m going to share with you my 5 Top Tips to a Cracking LinkedIn Profile.

So if you’re a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher who is looking to boost their employability, watch the video now:

If you want to download the FREE guide “6 Fool-Proof Tips to Boost Your Professional Profile and Get Hired as a Non-Native Speaker Teacher”, click on the button below to get it via FB Messenger:

Or via email: