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proficiency test

Why as a Non-Native Speaker Teacher You Should Take a Proficiency Test to Dispel Recruiter’s Worries and Get Hired

When you ask recruiters why they might be reluctant to hire a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher, one of the first answers you’ll get (apart from the market demand from students) is their worry about the candidate’s proficiency:

  • Will their English be good enough?
  • Will they have a foreign accent? (not that there’s anything wrong with having one, mind you)
  • Will they be able to teach all levels, including proficiency?

That’s why I think it is vital that as a ‘non-native speaker’ you get a proficiency test. This will:

  • prove your level of proficiency
  • dispel some of the recruiter’s immediate worries about your English
  • increase your chances of getting hired.

And in this video I talk about how to choose the right proficiency test for yourself and how you can use it to boost your job opportunities as a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher.

Have you got a proficiency test? Are you planning to get one? Has it ever helped you get a job as a ‘non-native speaker?

Let me know in the comments section below.

And if you want immediate results, then check out this FREE e-book. You will learn the exact 5 steps you need to take to get TEFL jobs as a non-native speaker.

Want to learn how to get TEFL jobs as a 'non-native speaker'?

Get this FREE e-book with your 5-step plan to boosting your job opportunities as a ‘non-native speaker’ teacher

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Rebecca
Rebecca
2 years ago

What you say makes perfect sense from a pragmatic perspective. However, “marketing” and “selling yourself” (an expression that makes me cringe) are basic traits of the system we want to fight. It is claimed that “the market requests native speakers” – as if the market was some kind of personified God we worship. As usual, someone has made the choice for everyone else and that has become accepted. Consequently, students that had never thought about a potential difference between the two categories, now firmly believe that they need a native speaking teacher. Brainwashing. Now, I understand that you want to… Read more »

Rebecca
Rebecca
2 years ago

I would say don’t waste more money. I know a few non-native English speakers that have a Cambridge C2 certificate and still get overlooked.
The only way this can change is by defining and fighting it for what it really is: discrimination.

Nicole
Nicole
1 year ago

I don’t think they are a minority. I have CPE, CELTA and a very international business background as teaching English is my second career. Even though I’m coming from the business side, I do have plenty of teaching experience. Having all these experiences, I still get turned down. I sometimes think it’s just a welcome excuse and easy way out for them.

Mykhailo Rakhno
Mykhailo Rakhno
1 year ago

CPE exam is a worthy self-challenge and a nice thing to have, but strangely some employers do not accept it as a valid proof of your proficiency. UAE employers consistently ask for IELTS Academic (at least 7.5), and Thailand requires TOEIC score (from 600 and up to 900 in some cases) to process your work visa application. As usual, there is no universal solution. As for job advertisement wording, there is yet another tendency to mention “a native-level speaker” (which is just another variation of NES in fact). While there is no strict official definition of a native speaker, this… Read more »

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