Why rebellious stubbornness (sometimes) pays off

Personally, I’m a rather stubborn type sometimes. And just a tiny bit rebellious. Like to go a bit against the current. Or maybe driven. It depends how you look at it sometimes. To give you one example, this whole website is the result of this stubborn rebellious drive to promote professional equality for ‘native’ and […]

Three reasons why you need to start teaching English as a Lingua Franca

Recently, you might have seen me post quite a lot about English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) on this blog. So perhaps, you might be wondering: what’s the big deal about ELF? why does Marek want me to start teaching ELF? how the heck is it related to TEFL Equity’s fight against native speakerism? That’s […]

Teaching English as a Lingua Franca: A Journey from EFL to ELF

I’m really excited that a book I’ve cowritten with Robert Lowe Teaching English as a Lingua Franca: A Journey from EFL to ELF has now officially been sent to press for printing and should be published in February 2019 🙂 EDIT: The book is now available here on the publisher’s website and here on Amazon.com). It’s been a […]

5 Principles You Should Follow to Teach Listening for English as a Lingua Franca Use

It’s no secret that English has become the global lingua franca. We all know that English has become the global lingua franca used primarily for communication between ‘non-native speakers’. The problem is, though, that many course books: still focus a lot on a very narrow range of ‘native speaker’ accents if recordings of ‘non-native speakers’ […]

What do students think and feel about Native Speaker English? by Steve McVeagh

Why is this important?  Six years ago, during postgraduate study, I first considered the idea that Native Speaker English (NSE) might not be the one English model to rule them all. I read Bhatt and Pennycook  on Singaporean and Indian English, and others, and Modiano and Jenkins  on universal concepts like EIL. There was support […]

Culture, native speakers and teaching English

‘Native speakers’ know the culture. They can provide students with cultural insights about the English language. And this is what students want and need to master the language. This is an argument that comes up time and time again to justify why ‘native speakers’ are better teachers, why they are preferred by students, and why so many recruiters […]

'English with an accent' a reading lesson by Anes Mohamed

This is the third lesson plan to appear on TEA aimed at raising awareness of different issues surrounding native speakerism in ELT. This time designed for EFL/ESL students. Pop back to the Activities and Lesson Plans section every now and again as it will be regularly updated with lesson plans both for ESL/EFL classes and for teacher training . […]