On-line courses

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English as a Lingua Franca and teaching pronunciation. A FREE mini course for teachers.

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Description:

When teaching pronunciation, we usually focus either on Standard British or General American English. So, we’re likely to look at vowel quality, weak forms, sentence stress and features of connected speech. The assumption behind this approach is that the more native-like the student sounds, the better.

However, according to research, such approach and focus is neither necessarily the most appropriate, nor does it lead to students being more intelligible in international contexts. In fact, many features of connected speech can reduce intelligibility in English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) settings; that is, in settings where the audience or the interlocutors are from a variety of first language backgrounds.

Consequently, this mini course is designed to present an alternative model for teaching pronunciation, frequently referred to as the Lingua Franca Core, or LFC for short. This model takes into account the global, lingua franca nature of English, and is based on latest research findings about pronunciation and intelligibility in international contexts.

What’s included in the course?

  • 5 hours of guided on-line study;
  • 4 lectures;
  • 4 videos;
  • 4 tasks;
  • latest research findings about teaching pronunciation;
  • feedback, guidance and advice from your instructor;
  • a selection of cutting-edge articles on the topic.

What am I going to learn?

So by the end of this course you will have a better knowledge of what LFC is and how you can help your students be more intelligible in international contexts. You will have looked at some of the latest research about pronunciation and LFC. You will understand why having a foreign accent isn’t necessarily a bad thing, and how you can raise students’ awareness of this to increase their self-confidence. Finally, you will have also learnt how to adapt your course book to suit the LFC model.

How do I sign up?

The course is completely FREE and you can enrol here.

 

Going beyond the ‘native speaker’ model in ELT: implications for teaching, teacher training and materials writing.

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Description:

It’s become sort of an article of faith that all research in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) should compare language learners with ‘native speakers’. Similarly, in English Language Teaching (ELT) the ‘native speaker’ is often said to be the ideal teacher and the ideal model of language. However, just what does it mean to say that someone is a ‘native speaker’? And “when we say:

  • you’ll have to ask a native speaker, or
  • don’t ask me, I’m not a native speaker,

what is it we are appealing to? What is it that human native speakers know? What sort of knowledge does the native speaker have?” (Davies, 2012, p.1).

What’s included in the course?

  • 10 hours of online instruction
  • 2 sections,
  • 11 lectures,
  • 3 videos featuring ELT experts,
  • 7 video presentations,
  • 7 articles by ELT and SLA experts;
  • guidance and help from your tutor.

What will we talk about?

Watch this introduction video to find out more.

What will I get out of it?

By the end of the course you will have a better understanding of where the idealised notion of the ‘native speaker’ comes from. You will have also questioned whether or not ‘native speaker’ language should be seen as the only appropriate model in ELT. You will also have looked at course book materials with a more critical eye and learnt how to adapt the materials to promote a more international view of English. Finally, if you’re currently teaching or teacher training, you will have also got a chance to try out some of the ideas from the course in practice, and to reflect on the outcomes.

So by the end of the course you will have not only learnt more about the latest developments in ELT, but also got an array of new teaching ideas and activities you can use in your daily teaching, materials writing or teacher training.

How do I sign up?

Very simple. Just click here to be redirected to the course page. There you will be able to read more about the course, preview one of the lectures, and to sign up.

If you still have any questions, get in touch or comment below.

How to teach pronunciation: the ELF perspective. A 6-step practical guide for teachers

 

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Description:

When we teach pronunciation, we typically think of either Standard British English or General American English. And the phonemic chart. So we’re quite likely to focus on vowel quality, but also on sentence stress, intonation, weak forms, features of connected speech, the omnipresent ‘schwa’ and word stress. In short, what we’re trying to do is get students to imitate as closely as possible a more or less standard ‘native speaker’ pronunciation model.

Here’s the big news, though: research shows that such approach and focus is neither necessarily the most appropriate, nor that it leads to students being more intelligible in international contexts. In fact, many features of connected speech can reduce intelligibility in English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) settings. This course then aims to present an alternative model for teaching pronunciation, one that takes into account the lingua franca nature of English, and one that is based on latest research findings.

What’s included in the course?

  • 15 hours of guided on-line study;
  • 10 lectures;
  • 6 practical assignments;
  • 10 hours of guided self-study;
  • 6 easy steps to implementing English as a Lingua Franca perspective when teaching pronunciation;
  • latest research findings about teaching pronunciation;
  • feedback, guidance and advice from your instructor;
  • a selection of cutting-edge articles on the topic.

Watch this video to find out more:

Content:

So in this course you will learn more about:

  • how ELF perspective influences our view of teaching pronunciation;
  • which pronunciation features we should focus more on in class and why;
  • which pronunciation features might hinder intelligibility in international contexts;
  • why ‘non-native speakers’ can be great pronunciation models;
  • how to adapt your course book;
  • what to consider before adopting the ELF perspective;
  • how to raise awareness of ELF in the classroom;
  • how to create your own pronunciation materials.

Take a sneak peek inside the course:

Outcomes:

So by the end of this course you will have a better knowledge of how you can teach pronunciation to ensure that students are intelligible in diverse international and multilingual contexts. We will have looked at and compared the current model of pronunciation teaching based on ‘nativeness’ with that based on ELF and international intelligibility. You will have read some of the most cutting-edge research about ELF and teaching pronunciation. Also, you will have learnt how to adapt your course books, as well as how to create your own materials to teach pronunciation.

How do I sign up?

Very simple. Just click here to be redirected to the course page. There you will be able to read more about the course, preview three of the lectures, and to sign up.

If you still have any questions, get in touch or comment below.


Testimonials

aaronI just finished the mini-course on LFC. It was tremendously eye-opening to discover how teaching pronunciation could be simplified for learners. The course gives you a great insight into the principles, and it also provides you with ideas and activities you can use in the classroom. I really liked the task questions in each section. They really made me think about the concept and helped generate ideas. I would recommend this to anyone who is interested in different ways of teaching pronunciation, where focus is on building students’ confidence and eliminate frustration.